Ships that travel more slowly emit less nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulphur oxides (SOx) and diesel particulates. That is why the Port of Long Beach in California, U.S. initiated its Green Flag – Voluntary Vessel Speed Reduction Program, which recognises vessel operators for slowing down to 12 knots or less within 40 or 20 nautical miles (nm) of Point Fermin, near the entrance to the harbour.

WWL was granted the Green Environmental Achievement Awardfor extraordinary compliance, as it kept speeds below 12 knots within the 40 nautical-mile range 64 out of 68 legs, or in 94 per cent of legs, during 2015.

“We are proud to receive this award as it demonstrates WWL’s commitment to good stewardship and sustainable operations in the Long Beach community,” says Len Mazzella, General Manager of U.S. Gulf & Western Area Port Operations for Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics.

The speed of every vessel in the speed-reduction zone is measured and recorded by the Marine Exchange of Southern California. Since the program began a few years ago, it has been highly effective in bringing down emissions and prevents more than 1,000 tonnes a year of air pollution. 

The speed of every vessel in the speed-reduction zone is measured and recorded by the Marine Exchange of Southern California. Since the program began a few years ago, it has been highly effective in bringing down emissions and prevents more than 1,000 tonnes a year of air pollution. 


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