We will continue to seek better solutions for RoRo cargo entering Russia – particularly in the Black Sea and Russian Far East.

Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics (WWL) recently reinforced its foothold in Russia by adding a new office in Moscow to its existing presence in St. Petersburg. Venture caught up with WWL’s Managing Director for Russia, Søren Tousgaard Jensen, to learn more about his plans for this fast-growing market.

 Why has WWL opened an office in Moscow?
“Moscow is the central vehicle logistics hub in Russia – a market that, following a brief setback in 2009, is experiencing rapid growth in the automotive and rolling equipment sectors. As importers in these segments, as well as foreign companies establishing a presence here, tend to base their main offices in Moscow, we need to be nearby to support their logistics needs in the best possible way. The Russian capital is also a major rail and trucking hub, which is key to our ambition to deliver a complete factory-to-dealer solution.”

 How do you expect the Russian market to develop?
“The mining industry in Russia is already substantial and we expect it to continue to grow in the coming years. Meanwhile, the infrastructure will become more developed, while the farming sector is likely to become more modernised. As the economy continues to grow, more cars will be sold, resulting in a significant increase in imports, even as local production continues to expand.”

What are WWL’s key goals in Russia over the coming years?“We intend to grow alongside, and together with, our customers in Russia. This means building our capabilities, in order to provide our global and local customers with the same diversity of services that we offer in other parts of the world.”

What is WWL’s position in Russia and how will this progress going forward?
“While St. Petersburg will remain our primary location for imports and exports, we expect the port of Ust-Luga to grow in importance, mainly in the High & Heavy (H&H) and breakbulk segments. Our terminal in Kotka will also continue to play an important part in the Russian import market. We will continue to seek better solutions for RoRo cargo entering Russia – particularly in the Black Sea and Russian Far East, both of which suffer from a lack of viable entry ports.”


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