"It was a rewarding and successful operation at each port. Good communication between port of load and discharge was very helpful, and the thorough preplanning and liaison with stevedores, terminals, transport companies and customers paid off in the end."

MV Titanias first call during this epic journey was to Auckland, New Zealand, on 4 July, where electric trains from Santander, Spain, were discharged. These are Auckland's new electric trains that will upgrade the city’s existing units. WWL will deliver 57 sets from Santander, two of which were on this shipment. Each set consists of three rail cars (171 trailers in all), and these were carried on specially modified 22-metre roll trailers with rail tracks.

On 8 July, Titania made an inducement call to her next port in Bell Bay, Australia. The cargo discharged were railway bogies on wheels from Savannah, Georgia, US. The railway bogies were 18.14 metres long, 3.19 metres wide, 3.82 metres high and weighed in at 102 tonnes. The locomotives were picked off WWL’s roll trailers and put directly onto the rail line in the port. This was the last shipment of 19 railway bogies for Tasmanian rail.

On the 10 July, the Titania was in Melbourne, Australia, and WWL’s new Multipurpose Bogies (MPB) were put to work for the first time ever shipping X’trapolis brand rail cars. Manufactured by Alstom Transport, these rail cars were delivered from Bremerhaven, Germany, and are for the Victorian Government’s railways. Each X’trapolis Rail Car was loaded on a WWL MPB and measured 24.46 metres long, 3.04 metres wide, 4.98 metres high and weighs 27 tonnes. This was the first time that a horizontal transfer of the rail bogies was done by aligning and rolling them from MPB to the transport truck with tracks after discharge. This ensured a quick and fast delivery, without any involvement of shore cranes.

The last visit in Oceania for Titania was another inducement port call on the 13 July in Newcastle, Australia. The rail maintenance machinery from Bremerhaven that was delivered included eight container wagons weighing 50 tonnes each and measuring 21.8 metres long, 3.01 metres wide and 4.14 metres high. There was also a 31-metre-long rail tamping machine, which was loaded on two roll trailers with swivel pallets weighing 90 tonnes. These were all delivered directly to the rail service in the port.

It was a rewarding and successful operation at each port. Good communication between port of load and discharge was very helpful, and the thorough preplanning and liaison with stevedores, terminals, transport companies and customers paid off in the end.

 

 


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